Also, don’t do any cardio. (Again, you’re welcome.) Because you want to maximize glycogen, interval training—which uses stored carbs for fuel—would be counterproductive. You can do some light walking or other aerobic training if it helps you keep your sanity, but nothing that could deplete your energy. Keep it to under an hour and perform it at a very low intensity.
Ultimately, you need to pick a healthy eating plan you can stick to, Stewart says. The benefit of a low-carb approach is that it simply involves learning better food choices—no calorie-counting is necessary. In general, a low-carb way of eating shifts your intake away from problem foods—those high in carbs and sugar and without much fiber, like bread, bagels and sodas—and toward high-fiber or high-protein choices, like vegetables, beans and healthy meats.
What can I eat on a no-carb diet? Many people reduce carbohydrate intake to help them lose weight. Carbohydrates are important macronutrients, but cutting them can help people to lose weight by making it possible to reduce calories and improve feelings of fullness. Alternatives to carbs can make it easier to stick to a low-carb diet. Learn more here. Read now

What can I eat on a no-carb diet? Many people reduce carbohydrate intake to help them lose weight. Carbohydrates are important macronutrients, but cutting them can help people to lose weight by making it possible to reduce calories and improve feelings of fullness. Alternatives to carbs can make it easier to stick to a low-carb diet. Learn more here. Read now


Hello, I saw that the largest meal (dinner) is labeled post workout. I workout every morning @ 630am. Can I continue to do so and also follow your meal plan as written? Also, I'll be doing this in home with modifications to equipment. Should I continue past the 21 days to get the maximum benefit? I'm 41 yrs. old, super active doing high intensity 5-6 days per week. I have lost more than 21 lbs in the past 2 months but still have about 50 more to loose. any help will be appreciated.
Hi Daniel, eating smaller meals more frequently won’t make you gain weight, it will actually give you more energy throughout the day and aid your body to burn calories more efficiently. If you are used to eating only 1 larger meal per day, I suggest you start by splitting that meal in half and maybe adding 1-2 snacks throughout the day. Once you are comfortable with that, introduce another mini meal to your routine and so forth…

Here's something else most people probably don't know: Fidgeting is good for you. It's considered a nonexercise physical activity, and it's an important way to burn energy. You get more health benefits if, in addition to exercising, you are a more fidgety, more active person the rest of the day. This means gesturing while you're talking, tapping your foot, just moving around.

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