"Feeling stressed can wreak havoc on our bodies. It can cause our body to produce the steroid hormone cortisol, which can make you crave sugary foods that provide instant energy and pleasure. Short-term bursts of cortisol are necessary to help us cope with immediate danger, but our body will also release this hormone if we’re feeling stressed or anxious. When our cortisol levels are high for a long amount of time, it can increase the amount of fat you hold in your belly."
Most low-carb diets advocate replacing carbs with protein and fat, which could have some negative long-term effects on your health. If you do try a low-carb diet, you can reduce your risks and limit your intake of saturated and trans fats by choosing lean meats, fish and vegetarian sources of protein, low-fat dairy products, and eating plenty of leafy green and non-starchy vegetables.
Eating patterns that restrict certain food groups can certainly help you lose weight, but many people find it hard to continue to eat that way forever. If you want to think of your diet like a relationship, you don’t want to be in an “it’s complicated” or “on-again, off-again” situation. You want to find your match — a meal plan you can feel content with for the long haul. That doesn’t mean you have to ditch all of your favorite foods for eternity. It’s okay to flirt with the foods that make you swoon, but you don’t want to settle down with them. When your healthy habits are solid, enjoying your favorite foods sometimes is no big deal.
Cortisone as an oral drug is another common culprit (e.g. Prednisolone). Cortisone often causes weight gain in the long run, especially at higher doses (e.g. more than 5 mg Prednisolone per day). Unfortunately, cortisone is often an essential medication for those who are prescribed it, but the dose should be adjusted frequently so you don’t take more than you need. Asthma inhalers and other local cortisone treatments, like creams or nose sprays, hardly affect weight.
You can definitely keep it up, just make sure you are getting all of your nutrients and caloric needs met. The only reason I don’t suggest to stick to this diet or any diet for that matter, is because I don’t want people to feel like they cannot enjoy their favorite treats and foods on a regular basis. But overall, this is a well-rounded nutritional plan that can be followed on a daily basis, of course, you might want to enjoy an extra treat here and there but besides from that, I think that it’s a great plan that can be adjusted to everybody’s individual needs!
I followed this plan for 7 days and lost about 6 lbs as well as 3 inches off my waist. Some of it was surely water weight, but I love the definition, flatter tummy, and the way my clothes are fitting. Thanks for posting this! I had a higher carb day yesterday, and today I got right back on so that I can reach my goal of losing 16 lbs and getting back to my high school weight. Thanks! This plan worked well! And, eaten as laid out, you can really cut calories without being ravenous all of the time!
It’s natural for anyone trying to lose weight to want to lose it very quickly. But evidence shows that people who lose weight gradually and steadily (about 1 to 2 pounds per week) are more successful at keeping weight off. Healthy weight loss isn’t just about a “diet” or “program”. It’s about an ongoing lifestyle that includes long-term changes in daily eating and exercise habits.
I always advice people to eat REAL FOOD. So after the 7-day shredding meal plan, you should definitely try including as many, non-processed highly nutritious foods into your diet (veggies, fruits, nuts, seeds, whole grains, etc.). Personally, I life Vega protein or other raw vegan protein powders that are free from chemicals, whey and other stuff that isn’t too good for you. Fruits are always good, it’s the artificial sugars that you should worry about. I have posted a delicious Quinoa protein nut bals recipe here: http://myfitstation.wpengine.com/2012/03/06/5-things-tuesday-homemade-snack-bars/
Potassium, magnesium, and calcium can help to serve as a counter-balance for sodium. Foods that are rich in potassium include leafy greens, most "orange" foods (oranges, sweet potatoes, carrots, melon), bananas, tomatoes, and cruciferous veggies — especially cauliflower. Low-fat dairy, plus nuts, and seeds can also help give you a bloat-busting boost. They've also been linked to a whole host of additional health benefits, such as lowering blood pressure, controlling blood sugar, and reducing risk of chronic disease overall.

In a way, moderate-intensity physical activity is that "magic pill" a lot of people are looking for, because the health benefits go beyond keeping your waistline trim: Not only can it reduce your risk of cancer, stroke, diabetes and heart attacks, but studies have shown that physical activity can significantly improve the moods of patients with major depressive disorders.
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