HUGE EGGS Surprise Toys Challenge with Inflatable water slideJohny Johny Yes Papa 👶 THE BEST Song for Children | LooLoo KidsMarshmello - Alone (Official Music Video)Numb (Official Video) - Linkin ParkGIANT Lightning McQueen Egg Surprise with 100+ Disney Cars ToysSesame Street: Song: Shake Shake The Mango TreePlaying in the Park on the Pirate Ship Playground for Kids Pink Car Ride on Power Wheels & Baby DollLukas Graham - 7 Years [OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO]DJ Snake ft. Justin Bieber - Let Me Love You [Lyric Video]JoJo Siwa - BOOMERANG (Official Video)In The End (Official Video) - Linkin ParkFetty Wap - Trap Queen (Official Video) Prod. By Tony Fadd


There are also a number of events which are recognized by the PGA Tour, but which do not count towards the official money list. Most of these take place in the off season (November and December). This slate of unofficial, often made-for-TV events (which have included the PGA Grand Slam of Golf, the Wendy's 3-Tour Challenge, the Franklin Templeton Shootout, the Skins Game, etc.) is referred to as the "Challenge Season" or more commonly as the "Silly Season."
Justin Thomas headlines the Sony Open in Hawaii, the first full-field event of the calendar year. Thomas famously shot a 59 here in 2017 and holds the 36, 54, and 72-hole records at Waialae Country Club. Defending champion Matt Kuchar also returns following his four-shot win over Andrew Putnam in 2019. Joining him are Hideki Matsuyama, Presidents Cup star Abraham Ancer and last season's Barracuda Championship winner Collin Morikawa. With 500 FedExCup points up for grabs, can Kuchar retain his title?
The tour began 91 years ago in 1929 and at various times the tournament players had attempted to operate independently from the club professionals.[1][5] With an increase of revenue in the late 1960s due to expanded television coverage, a dispute arose between the touring professionals and the PGA of America on how to distribute the windfall. The tour players wanted larger purses, where the PGA desired the money to go to the general fund to help grow the game at the local level.[6][7] Following the final major in July 1968 at the PGA Championship, several leading tour pros voiced their dissatisfaction with the venue and the abundance of club pros in the field.[8] The increased friction resulted in a new entity in August, what would eventually become the PGA Tour.[9][10][11][12] Tournament players formed their own organization, American Professional Golfers, Inc. (APG), independent of the PGA of America.[13][14][15] Its headquarters were in New York City.[10]
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