It's the 2019 Presidents Cup and Tiger Woods is set to play as captain, only the second in tournament history. When the U.S. Team tees off against the International Team, Woods will lead a stellar group featuring Dustin Johnson, Bryson DeChambeau, Justin Thomas and others. Hoping to stand in the way of a U.S. victory are seasoned pros Hideki Matsuyama, Adam Scott, Louis Oosthuizen and more. The contest will unfold at Royal Melbourne Golf Club, home to the Presidents Cup in 2011 and 1998 when the Internationals claimed their only victory in the series.
The 2019-20 PGA TOUR continues with The American Express. Phil Mickelson is back in action for the first time since November's WGC-HSBC Champions event, this time as the official tournament host. Hoping to stand in his way are Rickie Folwer, who returns to the California desert for the first time since 2014, and Francesco Molinari, who makes his 2020 debut. Also teeing it up in the star-studded field are International Presidents Cup team members Byeong Hun An, Abraham Ancer and Sungjae Im. With 500 FedEx Cup points up for grabs, who will come out on top?
Some events take place outside the United States: Canada, Mexico, Malaysia, South Korea, Japan, the Dominican Republic, Bermuda and the U.S. possession of Puerto Rico host one sole-sanctioned event each year. The events in Puerto Rico, Bermuda and the Dominican Republic are alternate events held opposite World Golf Championships tournaments and therefore have weaker fields than regular Tour events. In addition, Mexico and China host World Golf Championships and the United Kingdom hosts a major championship.
Three of the four majors take place in eight weeks between June and August. In the past, this has threatened to make the last 2-1/2 months of the season anti-climactic, as some of the very top players competed less from that point on. In response, the PGA Tour has introduced a new format, the FedEx Cup. From January through mid-August players compete in "regular season" events and earn FedEx Cup points, in addition to prize money. At the end of the regular season, the top 125 FedEx Cup points winners are eligible to compete in the "playoffs", four events taking place from mid-August to mid-September. The field sizes for these events are reduced from 125 to 100 to 70 and finally the traditional 30 for the Tour Championship. Additional FedEx Cup points are earned in these events. At the end of the championship, the top point winner is the season champion. To put this new system into place, the PGA Tour has made significant changes to the traditional schedule.[citation needed]
The CIMB Classic, a limited-field event held in Malaysia and the Tour's first sanctioned event in Southeast Asia. The field is limited to 40 players—the top-25 available players in the final FedEx Cup standings, the top ten available Asian players and five sponsor's exemptions, with at least one place reserved for a Malaysian player. The 2013 edition, which was part of the 2014 season, was the first as an official-money event.[60]
Justin Thomas headlines the Sony Open in Hawaii, the first full-field event of the calendar year. Thomas famously shot a 59 here in 2017 and holds the 36, 54, and 72-hole records at Waialae Country Club. Defending champion Matt Kuchar also returns following his four-shot win over Andrew Putnam in 2019. Joining him are Hideki Matsuyama, Presidents Cup star Abraham Ancer and last season's Barracuda Championship winner Collin Morikawa. With 500 FedExCup points up for grabs, can Kuchar retain his title?

Justin Thomas headlines the Sony Open in Hawaii, the first full-field event of the calendar year. Thomas famously shot a 59 here in 2017 and holds the 36, 54, and 72-hole records at Waialae Country Club. Defending champion Matt Kuchar also returns following his four-shot win over Andrew Putnam in 2019. Joining him are Hideki Matsuyama, Presidents Cup star Abraham Ancer and last season's Barracuda Championship winner Collin Morikawa. With 500 FedExCup points up for grabs, can Kuchar retain his title?
Most members of the tour play between 20 and 30 tournaments in the season. The geography of the tour is determined by the weather. It starts in Hawaii in January and spends most of its first two months in California and Arizona during what is known as the "West Coast Swing" and then moves to the American Southeast for the "Southern Swing." Each swing culminates in a significant tour event. In April, tour events begin to drift north. The summer months are spent mainly in the Northeast and the Midwest, and in the fall (autumn) the tour heads south again.[citation needed]
Due to increases in prize funds over the years, this list consists entirely of current players. Two players on the list, Vijay Singh and Davis Love III, are eligible for PGA Tour Champions (having respectively turned 50 in February 2013 and April 2014). Both have lifetime exemptions on the PGA Tour for 20 wins and 15 years on the Tour, and Love has won a tournament on the main PGA Tour since turning 50. The figures are not the players' complete career prize money as they do not include FedEx Cup bonuses, winnings from unofficial money events, or earnings on other tours such as the European Tour. In addition, elite golfers often earn several times as much from endorsements and golf-related business interests as they do from prize money.
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