Cortisone as an oral drug is another common culprit (e.g. Prednisolone). Cortisone often causes weight gain in the long run, especially at higher doses (e.g. more than 5 mg Prednisolone per day). Unfortunately, cortisone is often an essential medication for those who are prescribed it, but the dose should be adjusted frequently so you don’t take more than you need. Asthma inhalers and other local cortisone treatments, like creams or nose sprays, hardly affect weight.
It sounds like you are committed to your goals, congrats on that! There are soooo many factors that influence fat loss, I know that it can get frustrated at times. Personally, I have found that high intensity interval training has been the most effective for fat loss. In combination with a whole food diet, it has worked wonders for me. You can browse through MFS’s workout database & HIIT workouts here: http://myfitstation.wpengine.com/tag/hiit/ Did you start the 7-day shredding meal plan??
That doesn’t mean you need to ditch the scale, though. Studies continue to point to the fact that monitoring your weight can be an effective strategy for losing weight and discouraging weight gain (another healthy pursuit) provided it doesn’t cause any emotional distress. Just don’t get married to a number on the scale or get caught up in a set number of pounds you’d like to lose. Instead, settle on how you’d like to feel. Maybe you’d like to be more energetic or perhaps you’d like to manage your health without the need for medications. You can accomplish these goals without losing much weight.

Reduce your calorie intake. To burn fat, you need to consume fewer calories than you burn, which forces your body to turn to its fat stores for energy. To begin, lower your current calorie intake by 500 per day, advises the Mayo Clinic. This should ensure a steady rate of fat loss of around 1 pound per week. Too severe of a calorie deficit can be muscle wasting, adds bodybuilder and nutritional scientist Dr. Layne Norton; if you're losing more than 1 1/2 pounds each week, it's likely you're burning muscle too, not just fat.
The 7-day shredding meal plan can serve you as a great guideline, however, I do recommend personalizing it depending on your own goals. For example, you can use an online calorie calculator and protein calculator to make sure that you are getting all the energy and nutrients that you need. As you know, we all come in different shapes and sizes and our goals are not identical. Once you know what your body needs to perform optimally and to get the best results you can make the proper adjustments. For example, I myself need to eat approximately 2100 calories per day to support my daily activity and workouts and to build strong muscles… not that a random calculator will give you the straight answer but with trial and error you can find the perfect fit for yourself. Hope this answers your question.

"Protein is great for fat loss. It helps build and preserve lean muscle tissue and can increase the amount of calories you burn. It’s also a great source of energy that helps you feel fuller for longer, so you’re less tempted to snack. Good sources include chicken breast, tuna, eggs, milk and chickpeas. And if you’re finding it difficult to avoid snacks that are high in carbohydrates, try substituting them for protein shakes or bars. Remember also to opt for the lean sources of protein because some sources can be high in saturated fat."
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