You go girl! Thanks for sharing your progress, It’s always great to hear back from you guys! There is absolutely nothing wrong with eating healthy on a day-to-day basis (surprise!). You just want to make sure that you are getting enough calories daily, especially if you’re training hard…you want to fuel that body adequately and have enough energy to recover and feel/look your very best! and of course, feel free to throw in a little treat every now and then, it’s a lifestyle & you don’t want to feel like you are not allowed to have a little something that is “not-so-healthy” from time to time. When eating clean becomes a habit, you actually crave less and less of the processed junk and you actually start getting excited about things like oatmeal, nuts, dark chocolate, kale :O I’m happy to hear that you’re enjoying eating this way, keep it up Devin!


Practice intermittent fasting. Skip breakfast and compress your daily eating into a smaller window of time. If you’re a man, fast for at least 16 hours and eat in an 8-hour window every day- noon to 8 PM works best for most people. If you’re a woman, fast for at least 14 hours and eat for 10. In either case, this means you’re having two small meals and one smaller low-calorie snack each day.
Hi Allie, my advice would be to keep eating healthy while staying active. I never recommend starving yourself or unnecessary deprivation. If you do not eat grains, make sure you include lots of veggies into your diet (and fruit too). You need those healthy carbs for energy and weight loss 😉 You can adjust this meal plan to fit your individual preferences and take note on how you feel and the results you get as you go & from there you can make readjustments. As I mentioned in the comment right below, I would also recommend grabbing a copy of “The Body Fuel System” if you would like to educate yourself more when it comes to healthy nutrition for weight loss, performance and genuine health! Keep it up Allie!
Any movement counts. The numbers are daunting: The 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans suggest a minimum of 150 minutes (2.5 hour) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity a week (walking briskly, playing doubles tennis, raking leaves), or 75 minutes (one hour, 15 minutes) of vigorous-intensity activity (running, a strenuous fitness class, carrying groceries up stairs), as well as muscle-strengthening activities (resistance training and weightlifting) two days a week. But if you want to lose weight, work up to 300 minutes of moderate-intensity activity a week, or 150 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity. “But doing something just a few minutes a day to get started has benefits,” said Piercy. “So parking farther away when you’re running errands, getting up from our desks and going down the hall instead of sending an email -- those are things people can start incorporating into their daily lives now that may be a little easier than saying, ‘Oh my gosh, I have to figure out how to fit 2.5 hours of activity into my week.” If you are starting from zero physical activity, Dr. Jakicic suggests taking a 10-minute walk five times a week, shooting for 50 minutes a week, and building on from there once it becomes habit.
‘Do it for a couple of minutes in bed and you’ll actually be able to wind down and fall asleep more easily. But it’s a skill, so it requires a commitment to practice it, as with anything. Think of it a bit like dating – the first time you do it it’s terrible, it’s uncomfortable, nobody knows what they’re doing, but the more dates you go on the better it gets.

"When we’re lacking in sleep, our body’s hormones get thrown off balance which can impact our hunger levels the next day. We all have two hormones that affect our appetite: ghrelin and leptin. When we don’t get enough sleep, our ghrelin levels (the hormone that makes us feel hungry) rise, and our leptin levels (the hormone that makes us feel full) drop. This means that when we’re awake, we tend to eat more but feel less satisfied. Try going to bed a little earlier than usual to avoid this imbalance and remember to remove any distractions that might prevent you from nodding off."

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